Pete Shelley

Pete Shelley, R.I.P. Those Buzzcocks records, that Buzzcocks sound, it blew my mind in 1977-78. I actually have a vivid memory of the first time I ever heard them. It was the opening of Fast Cars. No one had ever made rock music like that before. I was stunned. Wow. Saw them twice back then, and still have a Buzzcocks poster on our living room wall. A bunch of jazz LP covers and the Buzzcocks. Anyway, a big part of my life then, the Buzzcocks were, those big geometrically dissonant power chords and staccato elfin vocals, the hooks and hot drumming. Forty years later I’m still surfing on a wave of nostalgia for a wave yet to come.

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Chris Stein

It’s just so cool to see Chris Stein (of the legendary Saccharine Trust and so many other aggregations) getting such a jazz man’s send off on Facebook, people talking about what a great guy he was and such a solid, inspired ensemble player. The grief is there, low and blue, but I think there’s no greater way to pay tribute to a musician who fought so hard against the inevitable than to talk about what a great guy he was and such a good player. He’ll certainly be missed in our crazy underground. He’ll certainly be missed on inspired nights at Cafe NELA. Bassists like him are a rare thing. People probably even rarer. A shame he’s gone but a treasure he was.

Chris Stein at Cafe NELA in another terrific live shot by Deb Frazin.

Eater

Back in 1977 I almost bought the Eater album, but I bought something else, who knows what. Then listening to a Sonny Rollins cut on YouTube just now, I saw the Eater album in the list of coming tracks. How that happened I have no idea. But I’m listening to the Eater album now. Never heard it before. Some of the cuts I know somehow, but not the whole record. About halfway through their take on Alice Cooper’s 18, I realized that when I didn’t buy this album I was only two years past 18, and next month I will be 41 years past 18 and I still didn’t buy this album. My friend didn’t buy it either, he stole it, way back when, which I suppose is kinda what it is I’m doing now, actually, since I didn’t pay anybody anything. Certainly not Mr. Eater or whoever. But when I tried to envision all the changes in technology between then and now it made my brain hurt, so I typed this instead and tried not to figure out where all these letters came from.

Steaming Coils

Listening to Steaming Coils lost masterpiece Breaded–the record, I don’t think it ever came out on CD–and digging Brad Laner’s drums. Way loose, loopy, groovy, just the right pops and splashes, splattery press rolls and punchy bass drum kicked loud under crashing cymbals. It’s all so gloriously unmechanical and organic, and the only other drummer that comes to mind is Jim Capaldi. I have a memory, maybe even true, of telling Brad Laner the Jim Capaldi thing and him saying he was a fan too. Grok. Not many were in those Bonham days. Everyone wanted heavy back then. Not me. I liked loose. That memory would have been at Be Bop records, I think, maybe even at the Breaded release gig. There were few venues then and we’d drive out to the depths of the Valley to stand in the back of a record store and listen to the sounds of the eighties underground. Afterward we’d repair to the biker bar next door and watch hulking Hells Angels play pool as their women tried to start fights. Then we’d hang out on Sherman Way like juvenile delinquents getting stoned with our fellow denizens for the long drive back to Hollywood. Memories. But back to now and I’m listening to the opening cut again. “Carne del Sol” it’s called and I want to know what it says the singers sing. Play it backwards, play it backwards, snare splat, cymbal splash and fade.

Blank Generation

This is a hysterical send up of Beat poetry–it was a parody of The Beat Generation spoken word LP–and an homage to Beat poetry at the same time. Trash the things you love. There is no higher compliment. Thus the Pistols annihilated the New York Dolls in “New York” while worshipping them at the same time. It was a punk rock thing. Years later I was at a show heckling my friend’s band because I liked them so much. Glares from the much younger audience. Try playing this one in tune, I yelled. A kid in a leather jacket and a Ramones tee shirt shushed me. Show some respect, he said. Respect? Seriously? This is punk rock, you little fuck. He slunk away. Ah well, times change. People are so nice now. I hate it.

Yes L.A.

I loved this album and somehow never bought it and it disappeared from the stores quickly. Believe it or not, there was no internet then, and no way to get a record once it was gone from the stores. Life was brutal, cave men like. We lived in holes in the ground and ate meat raw and listened to punk rock. And of all my favorite albums I never owned, this was probably my favoritest.

New Lows

Any fans of heavy, raw Aussie old school punk rock like X (aka the Australian X), etc, need to check out the cd by the San Francisco trio called the New Lows. Chris Guttmacher on drums. It’s maybe twenty years old with a power trio stripped down all to fuck kinda sound as the defrocked jazz critics say and I have no idea where you can find it besides Blue Bag Records in Cambridge. No, Massachusetts. If punk rock this past twenty years were a clarinet solo then the New Lows would be Pee Wee Russell to everyone else’s Benny Goodman. I’ve been switching off between jazz and the New Lows today, which while probably not healthy, has been bonecrackingly eclectic. In fact, as Joe Henderson just did His Thing, I think I’ll listen to the New Lows and listen to the bones crack again.